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AFC - Match Report
match report 1929-30 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
01/03/1930
 
Ayr United 5 - 1 Aberdeen
Kick Off:    Ferguson, Murray, Nisbet, Murray, Ferguson       Smith.  
Attendance: 5,000
Venue: Somerset Park, Ayr
FALL FROM GRACE. Rear Lines Over-run at Ayr.
In sustaining their heaviest defeat of the Season at Somerset Park, Aberdeen were humiliated though not entirely humbled in a playing sense. They had as much, probably a bit more, of the play than Ayr United, but though the forwards played hard and skilfully, they were badly supported by their colleagues behind, hence the result of 5-1 against them.
Aberdeen's defence has not played a poorer game this season, and with the half-backs below par, too, it was a blue look-out against a side that was clever, fast, and penetrative.
A goal for Ayr in the first minute was unsettling, but the Aberdeen forwards endeavoured to settle down to develop their usual polished game. The rear line, however, became as flurried as schoolboys, and ere half-time Ayr had chalked up another three.

The Fade-Out.

A first-minute goal for Ayr on the resumption was the fade out signal for Aberdeen, and though the forwards continued the struggle, at times giving a display of beautifully combined football, things had been allowed to go too far, and a goal near the end was their only crumb of comfort.
Just to illustrate that it was not the fault of the forwards, the inside men at any rate, let us consider the manner in which this goal came about. Cheyne slipped to Yorston, the centre passed beautifully to Smith, and the winger running in shot into the net. Excellent play, a movement sweet and smooth that bore the stamp of class. But how could a forward line settle down to keep up this match-winning form when they had to ferret out the hall for themselves for the most part, and when the backs and the goalkeeper were playing like beaten men, it could not be done.

Cheyne Shines.

The Aberdeen attack, even at that, was not at its best. The inside men were all good, with Cheyne the best forward on the field, but the extreme wingers were just fair to poor.
Ayr, from the start, struck a "can do nothing wrong" game. Play ruled from end to end, with Aberdeen serving up the real methodical stuff. Yet while Aberdeen's luck was out in front of goal, Ayr found everything they tried coming off. This was not due to a streak of luck, but to weak, undermined defence. Ayr's first goal by Ferguson was a header which should have been saved. The second was scored by Murray, whom Legge should have stopped from getting through. Nisbet got the third from a rebound at a time when the defence was spreadeagled, and before the interval Murray banged through a fourth following a corner which he himself had forced though tackled by three opponents.
An innocent looking run by the home left saw Ferguson repeating his first half performance, and the shot which beat Yuill, a minute after the resumption, should have been easily saved. In the first instance the raid should have been checked. The way Brae and Ferguson waltzed their way through was too simple for words. It was like a knife going through butter.
Even after this, the Aberdeen inside men endeavoured to save the face of the side but the Ayr backs defended well, though now and again flukily Hepburn, in the home goal, was so much in the wars that he was forced to retire, until a few minutes from the end, with a leg injury, and his deputy, Ferguson, with all the traditional "beginner's luck" kept defying the Dons until Smith placed the ball, just where he liked, between the posts.

Heartbreak.

It was a heartbreak of a match for Aberdeen. The Ayr side, the best they have been able to put in the field this season, struck a fast disconcerting game, but in regard to football skill, they were not in the same street as Aberdeen, and it was the defensive lapses that imparted the Waterloo touch to a game which from the purely spectacular point of view, was exhilarating in the extreme.
Aberdeen really must set their house in order for next season. Yuill seems to have lost confidence, and Jackson and Legge are not pull well together. They are not up to the general standard of the team's playing ability. The mid line, too, were far below form; McLaren, though he is a promising centre-half, is not yet the finished article, and he must learn that a centre half's duty consists as much of backing up the forwards and opening out the game as it does in defending. He failed to shine in either role on Saturday and never even attempted to be constructive. Hill is a youngster yet, and he, too, should remember that he has something to learn.
The ability is there, but he should study tactics a bit more, and watch the opposing wing as well as his own flank. Black can always be depended upon to play a steady game. He played with craft and forcefulness which was effective.

The Lone Scout.

Yorston got few real chances. He played a lone hand for the most part. Cheyne was a real star, scheming, shooting, and getting the line going. McDermid was so-so, and it was surprising to see a player of his experience becoming rattled and indulging in one or two heel-taps. He does not require to do this kind of thing. Falloon was not a success. He is whole-hearted and all that, but he is not yet ready to take his place in the front line. Smith, too, was disappointing. He had flashes of brilliance, but was too easily dispossessed.
Ayr's new back from Bo'ness did quite well, and McCall's return to the mid-line made for strength. Murray, at centre, was their No. 1 man. His presence galvanised the home attack, in which Nisbet, on the right, was a deadly raider.

Source: Press & Journal, 3rd March 1930

Ayr United Teamsheet:  Hepburn; Robertson, McBain; Yorke, McLeod, McCall; Nisbet, Tolland, Murray, Brae, Ferguson

Bookings:

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Yuill, Jackson, Legge, Black, McLaren, Hill, Falloon, Cheyne, Yorston, McDermid, Smith.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Referee: M. Quinn, Bellshill

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