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AFC - Match Report
match report 1934-35 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
29/09/1934
 
Aberdeen 1 - 3 Airdrie
Kick Off:  3:00 PM   Armstrong 82.       Connor 30, Connor 47, Mooney 81  
Attendance: 7,000
Venue: Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen
ABERDEEN SLIPPING DOWN LEAGUE TABLE

Another Deplorable Display Served Up at Pittodrie.

By "Clansman."

Aberdeen are in dangerous waters. Unless there is a big improvement their play, they will find themselves among the bottom markers. There will be no great improvement until there is a strengthening of the half-back and forward lines. The directors must take immediate steps to secure new blood for these departments. Further delay will be fatal. Airdrie are only a mediocre side, yet at Pittodrie Saturday they whacked the Dons 3-1, and there was no Question but that they deserved their victory.

NEW BLOOD NEEDED IN ABERDEEN RANKS.

Up to Directors to Remedy Glaring Weaknesses.

The Aberdeen directors must move now. The display of the team against Airdrie at Pittodrie on Saturday was, if anything, worse than that against Kilmarnock last Monday.
It has been obvious since the season opened that the Aberdeen team was not good enough, yet no serious effort has been made to strengthen the side.
The Dons have taken one point from their last five matches, and three of these have been played at Pittodrie. The results were:-
v. Hamilton (a) 6-1.
v. Motherwell (h) 2-2.
v. Celtic (a) 4-1.
v. Kilmarnock (h) 3-1.
v. Airdrie (h) 3-1.
These figures speak for themselves. There is something far wrong with a team that can collect one point only from possible ten.

Half-Back Weakness.

Aberdeen's greatest weaknesses at halfback and at inside forward. The defence has not been too convincing in recent matches, but this is possibly only a temporary lapse on their part.
If the directors are waiting in the hope that things will right themselves they will wait in vain. The team may improve - their form on Saturday was probably too bad to be true - but to delay further in the matter of securing new players is not only useless, but may well prove dangerous.
The directors must act at once. They must review the position carefully and find the quickest and surest way to establish Aberdeen as a force to be reckoned with in Scottish football.
There was a lack of confidence in the Aberdeen ranks from the start of the game against Airdrie. The fact that they did not get their usual encouragement from their supporters, combined with the disallowing of an early goal by Mills seemed to further affect the morale of the players.
It is something of a mystery why the goal of Mills was chalked off. Thomson took a free kick, the ball rebounded off an Airdrie player and Mills ran forward to tap it into the net.

Writing on Wall.

The writing was on the wall when Airdrie took the lead in thirty minutes. Falloon failed to get the ball in a tackle with Connor, and the centre deliberately smashed it Into the net.
The second half was only a minute two old when further disaster overtook the Dons. Ross raced away on the right, shook off McGiil, squared for Connor to again beat Smith.
Aberdeen tried hard to open their account, but although the best of luck did not attend their efforts, they were far from convincing at close quarters.
With nine minutes left for play, Mooney and Connor cut through the Aberdeen defence and the winger gave Smith no chance.
One minute later Aberdeen got their crumb of comfort. During a goalmouth melee the ball came out to Armstrong and the centre banged It Into the net.
One man only in the Aberdeen side came out of the game with an enhanced reputation, and that was Smith, the 'keeper. Although beaten three times he showed a welcome return to form, and he had one save in particular which will not quickly be forgotten.

Brilliant Save.

Ross gained possession from Mooney cross, and his close-range drive seemed certain to enter the net when Smith dived sideways and downwards to effect a brilliant save.
The backs did not inspire confidence, but it must be admitted they got little assistance from the half-backs, who were at sixes and sevens.
Fraser has failed to recapture his form of last season, and Thomson, although a willing worker, is woefully weak in constructive play.
Falloon Is not the defensive centre-half he was. He has lost much of his zest.
The attack was disjointed and weak at goal. Ritchie Smith on the left got across some good centres but he was often in too great a hurry to part with the ball.
Conwell was clever on the ball but too slow for First League football. This pair have the ability. Time and coaching are all they need.

Armstrong a Trier. It seemed as if Mills was to make a success of the inside-right position in the first half, but he faded away after the change over. Beynon, usually one pf Aberdeen's most consistent forwards was off form. His crosses were weak.
Hawthorn in goal, got little to do, and Calder and Shaw are due credit for great work in defence. The half line was superior to that of Aberdeen and the attack showed considerably more punch and speed.
Connor, at centre, was an opportunist, and Ross, on the right, was a fast and dangerous raider.
Mooney and Law comprised a tricky left wing.

Source: Press & Journal,1st October 1934

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Smith, Cooper, McGill, Fraser, Falloon, Thomson, Beynon, Mills, Armstrong, Conwell, Smith.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Airdrie Teamsheet:  Hawthorn; Calder, Shaw; Thomson, Crosbie, Todd; Ross, Watson, Connor, Law, Mooney

Bookings:

Referee: J. Baillie, Motherwell

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