Click here to go back to the AFC Heritage Trust Homepage Aberdeen Football Club Heritage Trust Logo  
AFC - Match Report
match report 1936-37 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
17/10/1936
 
Queen of the South 2 - 3 Aberdeen
Kick Off:    Cumming 76, Law 79       McKenzie 4, Strauss 40, Strauss 55.  
Attendance: 7,500
Venue: Palmerston Park, Dumfries
DONS DO NOT IMPRESS

Nearly Drop Point at Dumfries

LATE RALLY BY HOMESTERS

Aberdeen were a better team than Queen of the South at Dumfries and deserved the points, but their display did not savour of a team with championship ambitions.

Had they dropped a point, and they very nearly did, it would have served them right. With a three-goal lead they allowed themselves to be lulled into a false sense of security, and it almost cost them victory.
The Aberdeen defence wavered in face of a desperate Queen the South revival in the closing fifteen minutes. Two goals were lost in three minutes, and had the Dumfries team not been over-anxious they might have snatched the equaliser.

Not Much In It

The play of the respective teams did not suggest that one was at the top and the other at the bottom of the League table. Certainly they were superior, but there was not as big a disparity between the teams as the leaders' nineteen points advantage suggests.
Queen of the South received a nasty blow when McKenzie gave Aberdeen the lead four minutes after the start. The inside-right found the net with an unexpected shot from twenty-five yards' range, while Queen the South defenders concentrated on covering the other forwards.
While the Dons continued to hold the balance of play it was five minutes from the interval ere they got a clever second goal.
McKenzie worked the ball through before parting to Mills, and the inside-left drew the defence and slipped the ball to Strauss, who found the net with a fast drive.

Chance Lost

When the teams resumed after the interval Cumming had returned to his usual position at inside-right in the Dumfries team, McKenzie being on the extreme wing. This made for improvement, but still Aberdeen were on top and Armstrong should have increased their total when he was clean through, but shot practically straight at the 'keeper.
After ten minutes' play the Dons got a third goal. Thomson started the movement and parted to Armstrong. The centre tapped the ball to Strauss, and although the winger only half hit the ball it bounced over Fotheringham's hands as he dived full length, and landed in the net.

Tonic for Homesters

Aberdeen seemed to have the game well won and became careless. Fourteen minutes from the end Renwick let Cumming through to reduce the leeway. This goal had a tonic effect on Queen of the South, and three minutes later Renwick made another opening which Law turned to account.
The Dons were badly shaken these sudden goals and they were hard pressed to retain their slender lead.
The Aberdeen defence was weak under pressure. Smith was not at fault for either of the goals and made one brilliant save from Cumming in the first half. McGill was the weak link in defence, his tackling and kicking being unimpressive.
Cooper kept McMurdo subdued, but did not put enough snap into his play, and Falloon, although he did nothing brilliant, was a reliable defensive centre-half.
Thomson showed an improvement on recent form and was seen to better advantage in attack, while Dunlop worked hard, although he found it difficult to check Law.

Armstrong and Mills Listless

The attack showed occasional glimpses of brilliance, but for the most part the combination and understanding were below the usual standard. Armstrong and Mills were the poorest of the quintette. The centre rarely succeeded in eluding Gordon and gave a listless and unenterprising display.
Mills was rarely in the picture, and although he got away one two smart pauses, there was a lack of devil about his play.
Beynon was Aberdeen's smartest and most dangerous attacker. He revealed some smart touches against Savage, the best back afield, and it was unfortunate that his team-mates did not turn his crosses to better account.
In Mckenzie, he had a hard-working and forceful support.

Strauss Match Winner

Strauss once again proved himself a match winner. For long periods he was never in the game, but when he did receive the ball he made good use of it.
Queen of the South deserve great credit for their gallant fight back. Savage and Gordon took the honours in defence. Considering that he was opposed by the best forward afield, the left back gave a smart display, and Gordon deserves a pat on the back for the manner in which he kept Armstrong subdued.
Renwick was a whole-hearted leader, and although he was too well guarded to score himself, he was quick to make openings for others. Cumming, when he went to inside-riht, often threatened danger, and Law was a tricky inside-left.

Source: Press & Journal, 19th October 1936

Queen of the South Teamsheet:  Fotheringham; Smith, Savage; John Anderson, Gordon, Thomson; Cumming, McKenzie, Renwick, Law, McMurdo.

Bookings:

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Smith, Cooper, McGill, Dunlop, Falloon, Thomson, Beynon, McKenzie, Armstrong, Mills, Strauss.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Referee: J. Horsburgh, Bonnyrigg

Related Links: