Click here to go back to the AFC Heritage Trust Homepage Aberdeen Football Club Heritage Trust Logo  
AFC - Match Report
match report 1936-37 fixture list
Scottish Cup First Round 
30/01/1937
 
Aberdeen 6 - 0 Inverness Thistle
Kick Off:  2:45 PM   Strauss 10, G.MacKay (OG) 20, Armstrong 29, Armstrong 41, Armstrong 57, Strauss 86.        
Attendance: 2,372
Venue: Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen
THISTLE BACKS BUSY BUT DONS' DEFENDERS FEEL THE COLD
Aberdeen's victory over Inverness Thistle by six goals did not come as a surprise, although considering the south-easterly blizzard of sleet and snow which prevailed during the greater part of the match and the slippery condition in which the players frequently found Pittodrie Park, anything might have upset calculations.
Three of the goals were secured by the centre-forward Armstrong, and three by the South African student left winger, Strauss. Considering that Aberdeen were playing with the strong, boisterous easterly wind in their favour in the second half, it was surprising that Aberdeen did not add more than two goals to their interval lead of four. It said much for Thistle's defensive play. K. Munro and Mackay, the Thistle backs, wrought strenuously to assist the custodian, Sutherland, and all the half-backs - J. Munro, Ballantyne, and Murchison, gave valuable assistance in defence.

Source: Scotsman, 2nd February 1937

 
Gate: 105

N.B. The Glasgow Herald gave one of the goals as an o.g by G. Mackay. The Scotsman reported it as by Beynon. However, the Press & Journal also had it as an own goal.

 

VISITORS' KEEPER SHINES.

Inverness Thistle put up a gallant fight at Pittodrie, but proved no match for the better trained and more experienced Aberdeen team.

From the time Strauss gave them the lead ten minutes after the start the issue was never in doubt, and it became a question of how many goals by which the Dons would win.
Conditions were deplorable. The lines were cleared of snow, and the referee declared the ground playable. A strong wind and the icy conditions underfoot combined to make ball control difficult. It was quite a common thing for the ball to be swirled out of the reach of the player it was meant for, and even short passes were retarded by the snow, and often went to the feet of an opponent.

TRAINING TELLS

As was only to be expected, Aberdeen adapted themselves more quickly to the conditions than Thistle, and despite the fact that they had the advantage of the elements in the first half little was seen of the Inverness attack except for occasional breakaways. A four-goal lead at the interval in no way exaggerated Aberdeen's superiority.
The game became even more one-sided in the second period, and for the most part it was a case of the Aberdeen attack versus the Thistle defence. During this half the majority of the Aberdeen players wore gloves, and the defence especially must have benefited.

COLD WORK THIS FOOTBALL

Johnstone strode up and down between the posts in an effort to keep warm, while the backs and Falloon did occasional short sprints to keep their circulation going.
Although it is reasonable to assume that had the Dons exerted themselves they could have scored more than twice this half, the Thistle defence deserves credit for a very courageous display. None did better than Sutherland in goal. Time and again he saved splendidly, and but for his skill the score might well have reached double figures.
With ten minutes gone Scott broke broke through on the right, and when he crossed Strauss, who had taken up position in the middle, sent into the net. Ten minutes later Strauss broke through, and when he centred G. Mackay in attempting to kick clear sent past his own 'keeper.
Armstrong added a third goal after twenty-nine minutes' play, when he raced through on his own from a Scott pass, and gave Sutherland no chance.
Four minutes from the interval Strauss raced into the middle let Armstrong through, and the centre's shot glanced of the helpless Sutherland into the net.

ARMSTRONG HAS "HAT-TRICK"

Twelve minutes of the second half gone when Armstrong completed his "hat-trick" by racing through on his own and sending into the net.
Only three minutes were left for play when Strauss crashed home Aberdeen's sixth goal.
Considering the conditions under which the game was played, it would be invidious to criticise the players. Aberdeen had an easy task, and they did it in workmanlike style. The defence was never stretched, and Johnstone in goal must have been glad when it was all over.
The home half-backs had a good grip of the Thistle attack, while the Inverness defence must have experienced its busiest afternoon of the season.
It was impossible to judge whether the experiment of playing Scott, the Aberdeen reserve centre, at outside right was a success or not. Scott did quite well, but until he is faced by sterner opposition it is impossible to assess his true value.

SUTHERLAND THE HERO,/p> Although outclassed, the Highland League club put up a game fight, and the pity is that their financial return was not greater. The hero of the side was Sutherland, the keeper, but both K. Munro and Mackay fought strongly against overwhelming odds.
Murchison was a hard-working left-half, while Kay and Clunas on the right wing showed smart touches on the few occasions they got going. Gowl was a dashing leader, and Pyke at inside left showed speed and cleverness.
Clunas and Pyke came nearest scoring for Thistle. Johnstone knocked down a hard drive by the latter, and did well to touch over a fine try by Clunas.

Source: Press & Journal, 1st February 1937

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Johnstone, Cooper, McGill, Dunlop, Falloon, Thomson, Scott, McKenzie, Armstrong, Mills, Strauss.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Inverness Thistle Teamsheet:  Sutherland; K. Munro, G. Mackay; J. Munro, Ballantyne, Murchison; Kay, Clunas, Gowl, Pyke,McDonald

Bookings:

Referee: J. Taylor, Kirkcaldy

Related Links: