Click here to go back to the AFC Heritage Trust Homepage Aberdeen Football Club Heritage Trust Logo  
AFC - Match Report
match report 1923-24 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
29/12/1923
 
Aberdeen 3 - 0 Clyde
Kick Off:  2:15 PM   Smith, Moir, Smith.        
Attendance: 9,000
Venue: Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen
ABERDEEN OUTPLAY CLYDE ON THE ICE. BRILLIANT DISPLAY BY SMITH.
Thanks chiefly to brilliant play on the part of Smith, their left winger, who was recognised as the best man on the field, Aberdeen defeated Clyde by three goals to nothing at Pittodrie. In addition to Smith's two goals for the home team, Moir, the right winger, added a third. Clyde's defence, especially the backs, Cowan and Frame, played very well throughout, especially in a goalless first half, frequently saving likely shots. Culley and Wallace, on the Clyde left wing, were the most prominent of the visitors' forwards. Rankine and Paton showed to advantage. Nine thousand spectators witnessed the match.

Source: The Scotsman, 31st December 1923

 
Notwithstanding liberal treatment with sand the ice-bound pitch at Pittodrie, where Aberdeen defeated Clyde by 3 goals to 0, was in a treacherous, even dangerous, condition. Owing to the slippery state of the surface, the players, despite the use of rubber studs, had to exercise considerable restraint, and the game resolved itself largely into a question of adaptability and willingness on the part of players to take risks. In consequence there was much that was farcical in the game, and what between ludicrous incidents and some really bright flashes of football in face of the conditions, the contest, was always interesting and thrills not all scarce. The spectators derived much comedy from the "spills" sustained by players slipping and falling, and it was satisfactory that none came by any serious injury.

EASY WINNERS.

Aberdeen were easy winners; indeed had the margin of victory been doubled it would have more clearly reflected their superiority. That the scoring was limited to three was due largely to the inability of attackers to retain their footing when it came to a question of shooting, and equally a failure to attain more accuracy in marksmanship. The home players may have been more appropriately shod, but whatever the reason, they adapted themselves much better to the atrocious underfoot conditions, and showed much more facility and freedom of movement than the visiting team.

A GOALLESS PERIOD.

During a goalless first half, the Clyde goal experienced many lets-off. On one occasion Miller shot with great force against the crossbar, and Smith, who sparkled on the left wing, had two brilliant shots which narrowly missed counting. Apart from these incidents, the Aberdeen forwards had numerous good chances to score, but they repeatedly lost their balance when about to shoot, and more than one opportunity was lost either through misdirected shots or failure to shoot. Clyde, on the other hand, were seldom dangerous, but on one occasion they came near to scoring, when Brown, on the run, accepted a cross by Wallace to knock the ball against Blackwell, who had left his goal intercept.

SMITH COUNTS TWICE.

Until the closing minutes of the game, when, with a three-goal lead, they eased up appreciably, Aberdeen always held the upper hand in the second half. All the three goals were scored in the opening fifteen minutes. Smith sprinted away on the left to send a high ball into goal, and Shingleton, in saving, lost his balance and allowed it to slip from his grasp into the net. Shortly afterwards, following another raid by the Aberdeen left winger, the Clyde backs hesitated, and Moir, dashing in, scored with a terrific shot from close range. Aberdeen continued to monopolise the attacking, and the expected happened when Smith finished a brilliant run by scoring a third goal with a magnificent shot. After this the Aberdeen attack was rampant, and Shingleton, in the visitors' goal, executed numerous clever saves. Clyde rallied in the later stages, and in the closing minute there was a thrilling incident in the home goal. Blackwell, after holding a high ball from the right, lost possession, and with the goalkeeper out of his charge, Brown shot with great force, but Forsyth, who had taken Blackwell's place below the bar, jumped up and headed clear.

FORM REVIEWED.

Except in goal, no comparison could made, so little had Blackwell to do. Aberdeen were superior in all departments, and especially at back and half-back. Hutton and Forsyth were very safe, the latter especially showing fine judgment and resource. At wing half Davidson and MacLachlan were brilliant, their intercepting and constructive work being delightful to watch. Jackson, too, played well, although he excelled more as a defensive player. In the attack, Smith at outside left had his best game of the season. Always comfortable on the treacherous ground his fine speed and ball control was equalled by his accurate and powerful shooting. Paton revealed much individual cleverness at inside right, as did Rankin, but both were weak in front of goal. Miller distributed well, but was often beaten by the underfoot conditions, and Moir, although getting a goal, lost several chances in the first half by persisting with crosses when shooting was the obvious indulgence.
Shingleton, in the Clyde goal, made a slip by losing the first count, but saved his side a heavier defeat. Frame was the better of two moderate backs, who did not take kindly to the conditions, and Gibson was the best of the middle division, which was weak on the wings. It was the general failure to cover up by the Clyde defenders that accounted for the visitors being so badly outplayed. In an attack that was not adequately backed up, Brown (forward), and Wallace (outside left) were best.

Source: Press & Journal, 31st December 1923

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Blackwell, Hutton, Forsyth, Davidson, Jackson, MacLachlan, Moir, Paton, Miller, Rankin, Smith.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Clyde Teamsheet:  Shingleton; Cowan, Frame; Rae, Gibson, Chambers; Thomson, Ballantyne, Brown, Culley, Wallace

Bookings:

Referee: J. Bell, Dundee

Related Links: