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AFC - Match Report
match report 1908-09 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
17/10/1908
 
Aberdeen 4 - 2 Hamilton
Kick Off:    Muir, Lennie, O'Hagan 48, Simpson 90 (Pen).       ?, Millar  
Attendance: 7,000
Venue: Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen
At Pittodrie, before 7000 spectators. Play was spoiled somewhat by a very high wind which was difficult to gauge. Aberdeen playing against the breeze were most effective, Muir scoring. Robertson equalised. The play was decidedly fast in the second half, O'Hagan scoring easily, and Robertson again equalising. Lennie put the issue beyond doubt, and Simpson scored from a penalty on time. Result :- Aberdeen, four goals; Hamilton, two goals.

Source: Scotsman, 17th October 1908

 
The Aberdeen team on Saturday maintained their position as leaders in the Scottish League competition by defeating Hamilton Academicals, after a well-contested game, by four goals to two. It was witnessed by 7000 spectators, and was played in a stiff easterly breeze. The teams were:-

Aberdeen: Mutch; Colman, Hume; Halkett, McIntosh, Low; Simpson, Muir, McNair, O'Hagan, Lennie.
Hamilton: Mason; Brownlie, Davie; Menzies, Roxburgh, Ferguson; McLean, Robertson, Millar, Horne, Maine.

Hamilton being a lucky in the toss of the calling, played with the wind at their backs, and, once they were able to gauge its strength, the founded an immense help in the progress it assisted them to make, and the annoyance the flighty ball gave to the Aberdeen defenders. Hume and Colman had to show their agility in the opening exchanges. Muir and Simpson carried the play to the other end, where Brownlee was exercised. For 5 minutes the Aberdonians displayed remarked persistence in attacking against the wind, all their efforts, however, failing to bring any tangible result. Clever footwork and well-judged passing by the forwards and judicious placing by the half-backs were the features of Aberdeen's play. McNair had a chance close in, and failed owing to the attentions of the Hamilton backs. The visitors then, by vigorous, dashing play, raided the Aberdeen half of the field, and McIntosh, missing his kick, Horne got through, Hume kicking over the bar and giving away a corner to avoid the danger. After 15 minutes' play, a smart run by the Aberdeen left wing resulted in Aberdeen opening the scoring. A clever pass by O'Hagan let Lennie off, and the little man drove the ball across to Muir, who, standing unmarked took time to shoot and sent the ball with great force into the net, giving Mason little chance to save. The goal had the effect of pudding energy into the Hamilton men, who, by keeping the ball before the wind by strenuous hard kicking and quick following up, coupled with smart wing passing, gave the Aberdeen defenders no rest. End-to-end play followed, and in one of the Aberdeen runs McNair almost did the trick with a smart slip through, Mason leaving his goal to clear. Colman was not always top dog in his tussles with the Hamilton left wing, and twice Hume had to cover up when the right back was beaten. At the other end Simpson several times was well placed, and again and again his passes were badly timed, although he soon improved and crossed in delightfully style. Hamilton got the equalizer as the result of weak play by several of the Aberdeen defenders, three of whom terminating with Mutch, trying to keep the ball low against the wind, kicked it against opponents' legs. The ball was simply scrambled through the goal. Aberdeen then forced to play, and attacked strongly, two corners falling to them in quick succession. Hamilton again broke away, and the spectators groaned at another weak kick clearance by Mutch. A few minutes later the Aberdeen goalkeeper cleared a long shot, and got a cheer, which was meant to be ironical, from the "sportsmen" in his vicinity. A clever piece of play by Lennie was cheered. Lennie, when the ball was going over the line with the back holding him off, slipped round between the back and a line, fell, quickly recovered, and sent closely across the goalmouth. The ball was kicked out, and returned over the bar by McIntosh. Simpson then sent in a great shot, which Mason saved. At the Aberdeen end the Hamilton men had several excellent shots at Mutch. A clever run by O'Hagan was stopped near the Hamilton goal at the cost of a corner. Mutch made amends for passed mistake by saving a great shot by Main, who, beating Halkett, drove with terrific force, the Aberdeen goalkeeper getting his knuckles on the ball high up at the off corner and diverting it over the bar. Simpson, who was playing grandly, had another try at the Hamilton goal, Mason saving. After this the Hamilton goal had several narrow escapes, and Mason in one of his saves was almost bundled into the net with the ball, McNair slipping at the critical moment. Hamilton's attacks were repulsed, Hume being prominent with his head in defence. From a cross by Simpson at the other end, McNair cleverly headed in, finding Mason on the spot. Hamilton pressed by dashing play on the left wing, the parting shot going over.

Aberdeen started the second half in great style, and, after brilliant play, scored within a minute. Simpson got the ball, and tipped it to Muir, who directed across the Hamilton goal front. O'Hagan, sprinting in, took the cross on the run, and banged it into the net, Mason touching, but failed to hold it. Thus early the advantage of the wind was felt by the Aberdeen players, who, man to man, invariably beat their opponents, and in combination were infinitely superior. The attacked strongly, and were resisted by a tireless, plucky, and skilful defence. Accepting a pass from Muir, McNair beat the opposing back, and sent in a rocket shot, which struck the crossbar and went over fort it was an effort deserving a goal, as Mason was hopelessly beaten. After this escape, Hamilton played with dash, and held their own against the wind, making headway again and again in plucky style. Back came the Aberdonians, with a fine swing in their play, and bombarded the Hamilton goal, Mason saving in a scrimmage. Shot after shot was banged in by the attackers, only to come in contact with some Hamilton player's legs. Play was somewhat spoiled by the visitors adopting the one-back game for a time, but it was soon found but this was not paying against such a breeze, and wiser counsels prevailed. Another disturbing factor was the referee's crude interpretations of the offside rule, which aroused the ire of players and spectators alike. In a hot attack O'Hagan almost scored, kicking the ball against Mason instead of past him. Mutch, too, had his trials, and he was lucky when, faced by Robertson on one occasion, the forward shot over. He had to meet a subsequent Hamilton visit by leaving his goal and kicking into touch. Playing a stubborn, bus Ling game, Hamilton were doing wonderfully well against the wind, but they were distinctly lucky in equalising in a breakaway after being almost continuously in defending. Millar bustled into position, and with a high drive beat Mutch, who was late in his upwards spring. Then Aberdeen showed off their very best, as, amid a scene of great excitement, and encouraged by the cheers of their supporters, they simply bewildered the Hamilton defenders by the impetuosity and cleverness of their attack. After Mason had saved a long drive by Low, Simpson sent the ball obliquely across the goal, and, as it was passing the off-post, Lennie, rushing in, reached it before Mason, and nearly burst the net with a terrific shot. The goalkeeper made a great effort to save, throwing himself on the ground, but failing to reach the ball. The hot Aberdeen attack was maintained, and Mason got another rocket shot from Lennie, and saved this time. Muir missed a pass from Lennie with an open goal, and Mason saved from McNair. It was then Hamilton's turn to press, and they did it to some tune. McLean, beating Low, passed to Robertson, who sent in a raking low shot, which Mutch stopped on the goal-line, and scraped round the post when tackled, the goalkeeper sustaining a slight injury in the exciting tussle. For 10 minutes Hamilton were aggressive and towards the finish the ground team reasserted their superiority. From midfield Lennie came down on Mason at top speed, tricking several opponents en route. A little internationalist was barely 3 yards from goal, closely followed by two Hamilton men, when he was grassed by foul means, and the result was a penalty. Simpson took the kick, and beat Mason, the spitting his side two up.

The score fairly indicates Aberdeen's superiority. Gate and stands, 140.

Source: Aberdeen Daily Journal, 19th October 1908

 

Still Leaders.

By their clever win over Hamilton Academicals on Saturday, Aberdeen still keep their place on top of the League table. The press outside the city have been extremely profuse in their wishes for Aberdeen's success, but none of these epistles have awakened so much consideration as that from one or two old players who are sincere in their desire to see the good old club keep up their reputation for some time to come. It rests with the players, now that they have worked themselves into that position, to say whether they are to strive to keep it, and our information is that every man-jack of them will do his best to retain their place on the table.

A Great Fight by the "Acas."

Hamilton Academicals gave Aberdeen one of the hardest games they have yet had on Pittodrie since the present campaign began. There was a troublesome wind to negotiate, this being quite enough to contend with without the usual bright sunshine of the past few weeks. Aberdeen lost the toss, and had to play against the breeze, but this had little effect on their opening play, which bode well for the rest of the game. The "Acas" defence were hard pushed for a time, and it was no surprise when Muir trappd a swift cross from Lennie, and sent it obliquely into the corner of the net. Settling down after this reverse, the visitors gave a taste of what they could do in the way of making the ball travel. By their swift movements - for they had plenty of pace - the forwards kept the home defence busy, and a melee in front of goal ended by the inside-left beating Mutch all the way. Though Aberdeen put in some good work, they could not get on the lead, half-time arriving with the scores level - one each.

With the wind behind them, Aberdeen started vigorously, Simpson almost doing the trick at the first off-go. O'Hagan accepted the chance, however, putting his side on the lead three minutes from the start. Try a they could, the home forwards could not get past Massie again, McNair, Muir, and Lennie all having good, efforts. Another burst-away by the "Acas." ended in the equalising goal, and then there was some scurrying for the leading points. The game alternated frequently after this, the visitors looked like getting the points or taking one, when Lennie and O'Hagan in one of their characteristic runs crossed to Simpson, who drew out the defence and planted the ball well into goal, Lennie dashing in and scoring. A palpable case of fisting was allowed to go, and then when just on the finish, Lennie was again walking through with the ball, and got his feet whipped from under him. The penalty was taken by Simpson, and time going immediately after Aberdeen won by 4-2.

The Play and Players.

The surprise to many on Saturday was the fact that Hamilton could put up such a good fight and still be so far down in the table. We will be very much surprised if their luck does not turn, and their position very much impoved before the season closes. The forwards are still speedy and they believe in swinging the ball from wing to wing. Their halves were the weakest link, but their backs and goalkeeper could hardly be improved on. Mutch was safe in goal, and several of the shots he dealt with were done in a manner that stamps him as a class man. Coleman had a tricky wing to deal with, and it took him some time to understand their movements. Hume was strong in his kicking, and was even surer in tackling his opponent than we have seen him for some time. Low, Macintosh, and Halkett made an ideal middle line, and it would be difficult indeed to say which was best. Play was better distributed in the front line on Saturday than we have observed for some time. McNair was unselfish in centre and improves every time. The left wing taken all through were best, though Muir and Simpson were not far behind

Chatty Bits.

By their victory over Hearts last Wednesday at Dens Park, Aberdeen meet Falkirk in the next round of the Eastern Cup competition.
Halkett made his first appearance since his injury against the Hearts, and he was played on Saturday on the strength of his play at Dens Park.
The popular right half seems to have recovered entirely, and may be relied on to retain his position in the team.
The success of Aberdeen, so far, has no doubt been in having capable reserves for their injured players.
Blackburn is rather annoyed at being injured in the Hearts match, as he has gradually been getting back to his true form.
These repeated stoppages in play is bound to affect his position alongside the others.
It was the intention of the Aberdeen man-agement to rest Wilfred Low on Saturday, but the left half was of a different opinion, and said he was fit to play.
Low has not been absent from a League game this season, and he did not want to break the continuity of his play.
He instils a deal of confidence in the left wing when he is behind them.
Clyde are still the only undefeated team in the Scottish League. Their record far exceeds anything they have ever done in this competition.
There will be a collection taken on Saturday on behalf of the children of the unemployed. As the clerics says, it is to be hoped it will be a liberal one.

Source: Bon-Accord, 22nd October 1908

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Mutch, Colman, Hume, Halkett, McIntosh, Low, Simpson, Muir, McNair, O'Hagan, Lennie.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Hamilton Teamsheet:  Mason; Brownlie, Davie; Menzies, Roxburgh, Ferguson; McLean, Robertson, Millar, Horne, Maine

Bookings:

Referee:

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